Half saree models








Once named after the traditional dress for girls only unmarried southern India, the media Pavade Davani Sari now in high demand in the market. There was a time where half sari for girls in areas of the city or in the old days, was carried. At a time when half sari was almost invisible, you can now see in most movies of South India. Half-Sari has a great return on our television screens, fashion, etc.

A few years ago half sari is a traditional wear in the southern states of India. It is very easy to move, easy to carry, easier to use and simpler than the full sari. Half-sari is a long skirt that will play with a touch of sari and a long coat, which lies at one end of the skirt. Girls and northern India are going under the sari festival and dandy for marriage, girls are half saris Kerala Onam festival in Tamil Nadu during Pongal festival colored many young people on a range of saris and Andhra girls Ugadhi half. But now, this half sari surpassed the old name and now, several silk saris half of traders in different design and shopping centers.

Half-sari with different names in different states of India called. Ghagra choli or Lehenga is called in North India and Pavade Dhavan Davani only in Tamil Nadu, Andhra Prades Langa Voni, Mundum Neriyathum in Kerala. Call Lehenga, Ghagra Choli, Langa-Loni or Pavade Dhavan, all in the same package as you can get a high place. Visit our website and choose the one that, so what! After a few clicks. Half saris come in different designs and styles to buy. Originated in the work of embroidery glass, precious stones, made.


Whenever I see a woman with a colorful sari India, we can not stop at how elegant and feminine charm of surprise. We marvel at the many colors of fabric and the shape of the sari drapes and folds in the body of an Indian woman, seem to embody her femininity. We are amazed and can not help but by how even the slightest movement of their bodies seem to speak for itself, as they are almost sensuously despite the voluminous quality of the wrapped sari fabric around the waist to be impressed. So we ask ourselves what exactly is the secret behind the sari?

A Sari Sari or, as it is commonly called, is a traditional garment for women worn in India is nine feet long. Outside the matter, but an Indian woman made a dress made of cloth or even exactly the same design and is one of the color of the sari. The garment or can be very short, exposing a portion of the skin of the abdomen to the navel or more that can be tucked into the waistband of her sari. From the waist down the sari with an Indian woman wearing a skirt, the sari fabric Sheerness, reduce most fabric or silk.

The charm of the sari comes not just from the way he refers to the curves of a body, but also how it wrapped in the body of an Indian woman. This cover can actually be done in different ways. The most common is when an Indian woman winds or wraps the sari draped around her waist and the extra fabric over his shoulder and he fell on his right chest.

There are other ways or styles to cover a sari and one of them is kaccha Nivi style. An Indian woman, this style was used folded sari cloth and move the legs before returning to the waist. This type of cover is used by an Indian woman who covers her legs while would move about freely. This style is the traditional way of covering a sari, but it is now a modern Nivi used by most Indian women.

The modern Nivi is made by an Indian woman back end of her sari at the waist of her skirt. Wrap the fabric of her sari hips once and it collects in folds below her navel. Also folds to the size of her skirt. This type of fold is kick pleats in the West and movements especially walking, easier. Curtains woman in India, then the free end of the sari over her shoulder, right hip to left shoulder. With a cut blouse, showing Indians, one aspect of the stomach by draping style. Sometimes these calls are wrapped by a woman in India Sari set only the cowards hide or show your belly button to look more sensuous.

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1 comments:

Abdelbasset said...

Nice

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